Britain can’t sneer at failed euro states, it may soon be one itself

Writing in the Australian, Dalrymple continues his warnings of potential fiscal and economic collapse in Britain, including the possibility of additional civil unrest:

Wherever you look, the outlook is bad. The national debt is actually larger than it seems at first… The government has undertaken immense and totally unfunded pension obligations towards public sector workers, who have been granted a tremendous privilege by comparison with net-tax-payers who have to fund their own pensions. The public service workers will almost certainly fight tooth and nail to preserve these privileges, if necessary at the expense of the services they are supposed to provide (in fact it is already happening, with strikes looming), and so the seeds of civil unrest, discord and even war have been sown. At the very least we are returning to the pre-Thatcher days.

Read it here. Registration is required, but the Australian offers a free 3-month digital membership.

3 thoughts on “Britain can’t sneer at failed euro states, it may soon be one itself

  1. William Vaughan

    Britain like most western governments is enamoured with Ponzi schemes. Here in Canada we are a bit better off due to the vast natural resources of the country, but nevertheless the immigration policies of bringing in masses of immigrants to perform the low paying but needed tasks of our affluent society is the very essence of the pyramid scheme. And, of course all pyramid schemes eventually collapse. Post 2nd world war Canada prospered with European immigrants who came with skills and ambitions that were to a large extent compatible with the existing Canadian society. Many of today’s immigrants come from the third world with limited skills and frequently gather in cultural ghettos so that they have limited opportunities to climb the pyramid. The result is the pyramid becomes wider and wider at the base requiring more and more immigrants to keep it stable.
    Our so called health care system, which is really a sickness care system, since most health care is actually in the hands of each person, is on an unsustainable path with the growing demand for government supplied services that appear to have no limit, until of course it all collapses.

    Only a short while ago retirees would typically live for two years after retirement, but today the period for collecting pensions is ten times that. How long will the younger people be willing to support a lifestyle for the elders that they can never ever hope to achieve.

    Major inter-generational conflict may not be far away.

    To expect our politicians to tackle these problems with insight and wisdom is, I am afraid, a Utopian dream.

    Reply
  2. Kevin Morrison

    £12+ trillion can’t really be really true, can it? Isn’t that ten times the GDP? I know that boondoggle projects get bigger and bigger, but if that’s true, we’re all doomed!

    Reply
  3. Jaxon

    “The public service workers will almost certainly fight tooth and nail to preserve these privileges, if necessary at the expense of the services they are supposed to provide”

    It’s a disturbing prospect… I read in a newspaper recently that a churching going woman, a teacher I beilieve, was made redundant – she went out and bought pizza for a last supper (and knife, or knives) she gave her two children pizza then killed them and herself.

    Perhaps you’re thinking that’s far too extreme to have any bearing on this issue, if so I fear you’re gravely mistaken. Just how bad were her prospects for her to take this course of action?
    There is much that is truly sinister about our culture, what’s left of it, moral relativism, bad faith… in short, basically most of what TD writes about, that’s why I said, sometime back, with regards to TD’s reference to Burke – basically I think society fails in proportion as it is inclined to ignore Dalrymple.

    I occasionally run the writing of TD by people (and people I find rather agreeable) and even I’m surprised by people’s resistence to what he has to say, it’s a sorry, sorry state of affairs.

    Reply

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