The Black Book of the American Left

At FrontPageMag, Dalrymple reviews The Black Book of the American Left, a new collection of essays as well as a partial autobiography by the indispensable David Horowitz:

Horowitz’s essays collected here, written over twenty-five years, are dedicated to demonstrating that this leftism was not an ‘infantile disorder,’ to quote Lenin, or a mild and mostly harmless childhood illness like mumps, but more usually like a chronic condition with lingering after-effects and flare-ups. Those who suffered it only very rarely got over it fully, the late Christopher Hitchens being a good example of one who did not. He, Hitchens, could never bring himself to admit that he had for all his life admired and extolled a man who was at least as bad as Stalin, namely Trotsky; and his failure to renounce his choice of maître à penser became in time not just a youthful peccadillo of a clever adolescent who wanted to shock the adults but a symptom of a deep character flaw, a fundamental indifference to important truth. With the exception of Hitchens, for whom he has a soft spot and to whom in my opinion he is over-indulgent, Horowitz does not want any of the leftists to get away with it by rewriting not only history but their own biographies.

Read it here

One thought on “The Black Book of the American Left

  1. Rob

    This is either contradictory or badly written. Does TD mean that Hitchens couldn’t bring himself to admit that he had always admired Trotsky? The following sentence suggests not. I think he means that Hitchens could never bring himself to admit that Trotsky was ‘at least as bad as Stalin’. So TD should have written:

    He, Hitchens, could never bring himself to admit that Trotsky, a man he had for all his life admired and extolled, was at least as bad as Stalin.

    Reply

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